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Pressure Transducers: Zero Adjust vs Tare

On the surface, a zero adjustment and a tare function may appear to be the same. While occasionally they are used the same way, they are in fact very different.

A zero adjustment is, by definition, the calibration of where the true zero output of a sensor is specified to be. Suppose a pressure transducer is installed onto a pipe to monitor pressure in the line. It is not uncommon, in such applications, to see a slight shift in the zero output before any pressure has been applied in the line. The zero point of the sensor would then be adjusted to give a corrected zero output. Once pressure is applied to the line, it would then read actual pressure without any output offset from installation.

A tare function can be used to do the same thing, but is typically temporary. Depending on the application, it would have to be repeated regularly, which can easily become a nuisance.

The tare function, in effect, calls whatever output the sensor is reading to be zero, without changing the true zero point. This is more appropriately used in monitoring a change or taking a differential measurement. For instance, we have a customer who uses a digital pressure gauge to measure the weight of hay bales. The gauge is installed on the forklift, and the tare function of the gauge is used after the fork attachment is mounted onto the lift. This way, the gauge displays only the weight of the hay, without including the weight of the fork.

Check out the video below to see just how easy it is to use the tare function on our PG7 series digital pressure gauge.

If you still have questions about these two functions, or any other gauge function, get in touch with our Measurement Experts. Whether you use phone, email, or web-chat, they will help you find the measurement solution that best matches the requirements of your application.

Looking for digital pressure gauges that are more than just a digital readout? Our gauges have the functions and outputs to fit your measurement needs. Check them out below:

Browse APG Digital Pressure Gauges

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