Top 10 Measurement Expert Posts in 2016

Here we are at the end of 2016. We at the Measurement Experts blog appreciate your readership this year. You visited this blog more than 52,000 times this year, with more than 8,000 views on the most popular post. So, thanks for coming by!

The posts you read tell us which topics hold the most interest for you, our readers. To that end, we’ve gathered the 10 posts with the most visits in 2016. These are the posts that you read the most.

So, without further delay, the Top 10 Measurement Expert posts in 2016:

Santa's PG7 Altimeter

Santa's Sleigh and ReindeerDuring the holiday season each year, we often hear familiar questions:

  1. Is Santa real?
  2. How do reindeer fly?
  3. How can Santa deliver presents to the whole world in one night?

  4. Or my favorite:
  5. What keeps Santa and his reindeer from passing out when flying at high altitudes?

While the first three questions are better left to other experts, APG provided a solution for question #4:

The Net Advantage To You: Comparing The RST-5003 And The LOE Web Enabled Controllers

remote tank farmYou don’t ask for much.

You want to be able to control your Modbus sensor network, whether locally or remotely. Or both. You want automated, customizable alerts. You want data logging capabilities, and not just for reminiscing about the past; rather, you want enough data for both accurate forecasting and reliable trend identification.

Simple, right?

Right! It is simple! In fact, it’s so simple we’ve got two solutions for you: the RST-5003 and the LOE Web Enable Controllers. Both can control up to 10 Modbus sensors, have embedded webpages for local Ethernet setup and configuration, and connect directly to www.levelandflow.com.

So, which one makes more sense for you? Let’s take a look.

Doing The Dos: Five Tips For Taking Care Of Your Sensor Diaphragm

diaphragm damaged by over pressureFor all continuous output pressure sensors, no matter the application, the component most sensitive to external factors, and most crucial to sensor functionality, is the sensing diaphragm. If it is not working correctly, either your readings will be incorrect or, in extreme cases, you will have no readings at all.

So often in the world around us, we hear “Don’t do this” or “Don’t do that” yadda, yadda, yadda…. Let’s try a more positive approach. Here are five Dos which, if followed, will keep your sensor and its diaphragm performing great.